Woman with brown hair smiling.

Morenas usually have dark hair, and if you fit this description, for sure you’ve been told not to bother with lighter hair colors as these allegedly won’t look good on you. Do not believe the haters. Numerous factors can influence the ideal hair color for morena skin, which can range from the dark browns to the blondes.

If you prefer a more natural-looking hue, chocolate brown is a rich brown color that’s sure to make you look extra sophisticated. It looks best with shiny hair, so you’ll need to condition your hair and apply some serum for a smooth, satiny finish.

Have you been itching to go blonde? Ash blonde, bronde (brown + blonde), a balayage, and platinum blonde can certainly work on you. That’s because both warm and cool shades complement and highlight the glow of your dusky skin tone.

A rule of thumb for finding the ideal hair color for morena skin is by working with your skin’s undertone. If you have a dark complexion, your undertone can be warm (gold or yellow hues), cool (pink or blue hues), or neutral (olive). A good way to know your undertone is to check the color of the veins on your wrist. If the veins are green, you have a warm undertone. In which case, warm-toned hair colors likes honey blonde, cinnamon brown, and a fiery auburn will look perfect.

If your veins appear bluish, you have a cool undertone. Platinum blonde, ashy blonde, and even rose gold will add more glow to your look. If your veins are blue-green, your neutral undertone will go well with a mix of warm and cool hair colors. You can have a chocolate brown base with honey blonde or golden brown highlights.

For your dyed hair to look its best in the long run, maintaining it is a must. Don’t fret. Here are ways to care for your color-treated hair at home:

1. Avoid Sun Exposure

Sun exposure can damage and fade the color of your dyed hair, resulting in dull, listless strands. If you’re getting your vitamin D fix by spending time under the sun, protect your hair with a hat or a headwrap.

2. Say No to Blow-Dryers and Other Heat Styling Tools

Heat can really damage color-treated hair since your strands have become more vulnerable due to all the chemicals applied to them. Avoid blow-dryers for now, especially if you can’t go to the salon for maintenance treatments. Towel-dry or air-dry instead. If the need to blow-dry persists, protect your tresses with a heat protectant spray.

3. Use a Shampoo That Won’t Change Your Hair Color

Shampooing your hair often can lead to color-fading, but we know that it’s impossible to forego shampoo altogether. If you’ve dyed your hair a dark brown shade, try TRESemmé Color Radiance Shampoo. It’s formulated with a color radiance booster and jojoba oil to protect the strands and lock the color in the fibers.

For your blonde hair, the TRESemmé Blonde Brilliance Anti-Fade Color Shampoo will help make your chosen shade last long. It has violet pigments in its anti-fade technology to prevent your shade of blonde from becoming brassy.

4. Use a Conditioner That Targets Damage

Conditioner is dyed hair’s best friend since the two go so well together. If your dyed locks are starting to look dry and damaged, try Dove 1 Minute Serum Conditioner Intense Repair. It’s infused with coconut oil, almond oil, argan oil, sunflower seed oil, and vitamin E to deeply nourish damaged hair quickly and efficiently. The result? Hair that looks as bright and shiny as ever.

5. Message Your Hairstylist

Ask your hairstylist for advice on a faded ‘do or showing roots. If you want to take the DIY route during GCQ, the wise way to go about it is by seeking helpful tips from your stylist. Whether it’s about disguising your roots, making your hair look bright and vibrant, and caring for color-treated hair, your stylist can give you the info and the hacks you need for maintaining your hair color.

Finding the hair color for morena skin that looks perfect on you is a journey in itself. But it doesn’t end there. Maintenance matters to keep the color-treated strands looking their best and to avoid unwanted color changes.